In a weak attempt to back the artists trying to save the Aerosol Arts Mecca building complex in Long Island City, Queens, New York, the artist known as “Bansky” hung large block balloons that spelled out his name on a vacant building at 35th Street and Borden Avenue, overlooking the Long Island Expressway.  Not quite the support this group was hoping to get from this infamous British street artist.

IMG_5894

Judge Frederick Block was holding hearings to decide whether art is transitory or permanent.  The distraction caused by Banksy probably hurt the group.  “I understand his need for mystery to feed the press,” said Jonathan Cohen, who is the group’s curator and is also known as “Meres One.”  Mr. Cohen blames the media for “treating “Bansky” as the Robin Hood of graffiti instead of covering the legal graffiti artists trying to save the largest legal collection of graffiti in the world.  Meanwhile, you can’t find a paper that’s not covering “Banksy.”

IMG_5895

Mr. Cohen instead had hoped for a stronger show of support instead of this self serving advertisement.  The group wasn’t asking for any monetary support from “Bansky.”  All they wanted was a few words of support.  “Mr. Banksy why didn’t you put a comment out?  Maybe “Banksy’s” show of support would’ve attracted the media to the 5 Pointz complex  at 22-44 Jackson Avenue.

IMG_5893

The owner of the complex, Jerry Wolkoff meanwhile had the buildings white-washed after he won approval from the New York City Planning Commission to demolish the complex and replace it with residential towers.

Demolition  preparation had been strictly prohibited by the judge who had issued a temporary restraining order in an effort to get both parties to the negotiating table.

OH NO! GRAFFITI MECCA 5POINTZ IN LONG ISLAND CITY IS GONE

Inigo del CastilloCONTRIBUTOR

by Inigo del Castillo in Cool Travel on Monday 25 November 2013

5Pointz is a warehouse in Long Island City, Queens that’s considered as the premier mecca for graffiti artists worldwide. It was a legal haven where artists could freely express their creativity, and where tourists would flock to admire the usually frowned upon art style of graffiti.

Advertisements